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Visualizing 15 Years Of Acquisitions By Apple, Google, Yahoo, Amazon, And Facebook

Hi Folks,

Its been a while! I wanted to share a very interesting article from Josh Constine and Tech Crunch about 15 years of acquisitions by leading tech giants. Check this out. Pretty interesting stuff.

-DF

Visualizing 15 Years Of Acquisitions By Apple, Google, Yahoo, Amazon, And Facebook

You grow old, you slow down, and you die. That is, unless you can inject some fresh blood. After watching the last generation of tech giants wither or stagnate, today’s juggernauts are relying on acquisitions to keep them young and relevant. Check out the interactive infographic below to compare the size, frequency, and focus of the last 15 years of acquisitions by Apple, Amazon, Google, Yahoo, and Facebook.

Business insurance provider Simply Business created this infographic, which is only available here on TechCrunch. Each dot’s size represents the price paid for that startup if it was disclosed. Scroll over them for a link to learn more about the deal. The plus and minus buttons in the top right let you zoom in on specific time periods. Select categories at the top to filter for certain types of acquisitions. The Frequency toggle reveals phases when companies did heavy buying. And you can click any of the tech giants’ logos to view a complete list of their full-scale acquisitions (small acqui-hires excluded). Sorry to our mobile readers, but it’s much easier (possible) to navigate this on the web.

Trends crystallized by the Simply Business infographic include:

The drought of acquisitions by Yahoo in 2011 and 2012 before Marissa Mayer began her buying spree after being named CEO.
Apple has kept the price of its acquisitions low despite its huge cash reserves, as it prefers to buy for technology rather than market share.
Facebook accelerated its talent-focused acquisitions following its IPO to combat brain-drain.
While Steve Jobs saw acquisitions as a “failure to innovate,” Tim Cook has been proactive about buying companies to bring new intellectual property to Apple.
There was a recession in acquisitions in the “Rest In Peace: Good Times” era from 2008 to 2009.
Social, mobile, and hardware acquisitions have come into favor as search, media, and advertising buys have waned in the past few years

And the biggest acquisitions (with disclosed prices) by the giants were:

  • Apple – Anobit ($390 million), AuthenTec ($356 million)
  • Amazon – Zappos ($900 million), Kiva Systems ($775 million)
  • Google – Motorola Mobility ($12.5 billion), Nest ($3.2 billion), DoubleClick ($3.1 billion), YouTube ($1.65 billion)
  • Yahoo – Broadcast.com ($5 billion), Overture ($1.83 billion), Tumblr ($1.1 billion)
  • Facebook – WhatsApp ($19 billion), Instagram ($1 billion, closed at $715 million)

YOU CAN READ THE WHOLE ARTICLE HERE

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Written by David Frederick

February 26, 2014 at 12:01 PM

Series A Crunch And The Lean Funding Model

Duncan Davidson of Bullpen Capital recently presented a very interesting concept at the December 2011 TechCrunch conference in Tokyo. At the conference he discussed how the lean startup model had given rise to a lean finance model for venture capital.

The concept: keep funding lean for as long as possible, until the startup has validated its model and is beginning to scale. Usually it takes around six months of metrics to be in position to raise a big round. That “shovel-in” round is where the lean model catches up to the traditional venture model, as shown in the chart.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image: BullPen capital

By using this process, the founders have preserved more ownership as well as their options. Most startups are not suited to become billion-dollar babies, and exit via M&A, often quickly (a “quick flip”). Lean funding makes the quick flip attractive both to the founders, who often each pocket at least $10M, and the funders, who make larger multiples on their invested capital by putting less in. If this happens quickly, the IRR can be quite attractive to the LPs who invest into the lean venture funds.  They have learned to be wary of big venture, where their capital is tied up for ten or more years.

To learn more, read the TechCrunch article and view the interview with Duncan, click here!

-DF

Written by David Frederick

December 6, 2011 at 5:57 PM

SoLoMo And What It Means For You And Your Business

Oh SoLoMo…..

What’s SoLoMo you say? SoLoMo (social, location, and mobile) is a trend larger than any single app or company, and it will encompass every industry on the planet. The future of mobile location will see the integration of location-enabled features and insights into every product you touch and every process you engage in during the course of your life, providing great efficiencies and incredibly valuable insights.

Every industry is, and will increasingly be affected by mobile devices and location-sensing technology. What we’re seeing today in the arenas of local commerce, deals, and productivity is only the beginning. With Internet and location-enabled phones in the hands of billions all around the world, the future of mobile location is rapidly becoming our future as an advanced civilization. As many of you know however, I am very concerned about the security responsibility and privacy issues around SoLoMo. Like all technology, there are always ethics issues involved in its development, deployment, and  utilization. But that’s a future blog posting!

Regardless, Fast Company has a really interesting article on SoLoMo and Mobile. You can check it out!

-DF

Written by David Frederick

December 6, 2011 at 5:26 PM

Mobile Spyware And Why You Should Be Concerned

Technology is truly a marvel, and like many “marvels” it can be used for good and evil. Apparently, the good folks at our mobile carriers are very interested in what you do with your mobile/smart phone. Consensual Data Capture is one thing, spying…. yes spying is another. No this isn’t a three-letter government agency doing this, but our mobile carriers or literally anyone else who happens to buy the right software to access the embedded spyware.

It was bad enough that “certain” organizations were tracking Black Friday shoppers without their knowledge in malls via their mobile/smart phones, but now we are learning about a new and very disturbing revelation around the amount of data, communication, and PII (Personally Identifiable Information) mobile carriers are collecting, whose using it, and how they are collecting it.

Don’t get me wrong, I am all for ways in which to drive and capture consensual consumer behavior, KPI’s, market metrics, and behavior to help drive more effective solutions, services, usage, and strategies, but the consumer should be informed AND give their consent to allow the capture and usage of this information. Apparently, this is not the case here.

Remember when Apple was tracking people’s location movements via their iPhone’s and cataloging the data? This is way worse. Of course, Apple was forced to stop that practice. But this new embedded spyware? If you own a non-Apple smart phone you should check out this disturbing article. So far, it effects 100 million of you. Even you do own an Apple iPhone, you should still check it out. This could still be happening with your iPhone.We just don’t know yet.

-DF

Tens of Millions of Smartphones Come With Spyware pre-installed, Security Analyst Says

Over 100 million smartphones are tracking their owners’ every step, Android developer Trevor Eckhart claimed, thanks to software that comes pre-installed on phones from most major carriers.

During a security demonstration revealed on Monday, Eckhart showed how software developed by Carrier IQ tracks virtually everything a user does — going as far as logging individual keystrokes and button presses. The company claims it helps its customers improve quality and performance “by counting and measuring operational information in mobile devices.” Security experts call it spyware.

“I assume that when I SMS my wife on the phone, no one is intercepting that message,” Chet Wisniewski of security firm Sophos told FoxNews.com. He called the whole ordeal is a “serious invasion of privacy.”

“Why do they need to know when I’m logging into Bank of America, when I’m accessing my password? It’s a different level of snooping,” he said.

Developed as a mobile analytics platform, Carrier IQ’s software can be found on most Android, BlackBerry and Nokia phones — over 140 million phones in total, the company’s website boasts. Some reports suggest Apple iPhones may carry the software as well.

The company has flat out denied that its software records keystrokes, a claim Eckhart’s latest video seems to refute.

“Every button you press in the dialer before you call,” Eckhart says in his latest video, “it already gets sent off to the IQ application.”

Eckhart did not return FoxNews.com phone calls, and Carrier IQ declined to comment on his claims. A statement on the company’s website reiterates the company’s claims that its software does not track customers or record keystrokes.

“This information is used by our customers as a mission critical tool to improve the quality of the network, understand device uses and ultimately improve the user experience,” the company said. By evaluating these metrics, Carrier IQ aims to help with issues such as “dropped calls and battery drain.”

In videos showing Carrier IQ at work, Eckhart showed it going beyond such utilitarian monitoring. He showed Carrier IQ’s software monitoring entire text messages, a Google search, and his location, even during sessions protected by HTTPS, a security protocol that encrypts communications for sensitive transactions like online banking.

Sprint has acknowledged using Carrier IQ’s software, but denies having access to personal data.

“Carrier IQ provides information that allows Sprint, and other carriers that use it, to analyze our network performance and identify where we should be improving service,” Sprint told CNET earlier this month. “We collect enough information to understand the customer experience with devices on our network and how to address any connection problems, but we do not and cannot look at the contents of messages, photos, videos, etc., using this tool,” Sprint continued.

While Wisniewski understands the needs for data and metrics, he believes carriers must be more forthcoming about how they are monitoring their users, what data they are collecting, and how they are protecting that data.

“If you’re going to collect that kind of information from people, you have to meet a different standard,” Wisniewski told FoxNews.com.

But for now, most users are stuck, unable to even turn off or uninstall the program.

“The Carrier IQ application is embedded so deeply in the device that it can’t be fully removed without rebuilding the phone from source code,” Eckhart wrote on his website.

“Even where a device is out of contract, there is no off switch to stop the application from gathering data.”

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2011/12/01/is-your-smartphone-secretly-spying-on/#ixzz1fJJ3Zfhk

Written by David Frederick

December 1, 2011 at 2:58 PM

Keeping Your Project On Track

Don’t you hate it when you get those pop up messages that tell you a task, item, project or activity is late? Some software applications give you a color key to tell you and your team you’re late – Red, Yellow, Orange and Green. Others give you a cute smiley face, sad face or a grimace. That’s because a project plan and managing that plan is all about staying on track. Especially if there are interlocking, parallel and contingent based activities in your plan or workflow. In fact, the most common problem in managing projects big and small, is falling behind schedule.

As we all know, it’s difficult to avoid delays. Especially when there many moving parts in the project or the project movement/activity is tied to others contributing, but you can often improve your situation and still complete the project on time by using some common sense methods.

Try one of these three approaches before accepting the inevitability of defeat or a project hold up:

  • Use the end to recover. Look at the long-term plan. Find places later in the schedule where you can make up for lost time. Even better, build in areas of recovery in your project plan. I have yet to see a project plan that executes to plan and time allocation. Ever!
  • Narrow the scope. Focus on the true goal and end result. Eliminate nonessential elements to reduce cost and save time.
  • Keep your plan fluid. There will always be factors that impact your plan. Ensure your plan is fluid enough to absorb disruption. If your plan is to rigid, you will be knocked completely off course with little chance of full recovery. See the first bullet.
  • Renegotiate with stakeholders. Explore alternatives. Discuss the possibility of increasing the budget or extending deadlines to keep the project on track. Regrettably, this is a solution or tactic of absolute last resort. There is almost never enough money or time to increase the budget without consequences to the project AND your career. Ever. You should have planned better. Deadlines are tricky things in that they are almost always driven by multiple and competing interests –  clients (internal and external), departments, manufacturing, marketing, etc. Again, you should have planned better. Remember, make sure you are not tied to the stake before you put the stake in the ground on deadlines and budget!

As you know, there are millions of books on project management as well as an equal number of frameworks and methodologies. Be sure to use a methodology that suits your project. Use common sense. You would be surprised what a little common sense can do to keep you on track.  You can also check out this interesting article on keeping your projects on track. It has some interesting ideas.

Guide To Project Management

by Loren Gary, Gary Klein, Ron Ashkenas, Melissa Raffoni, Tom Cross, Jon R. Katzenbach, Douglas K. Smith, Nadim F. Matta, Ray Sheen, Clayton M. Christensen, Matt Marx, Howard H. Stevenson, Jimmy Guterman
Source: Harvard Business Review

-DF

Written by David Frederick

November 29, 2011 at 12:48 PM

My Dear Friend Thucydides

As we American’s sit with a $15 Trillion deficit (and growing), the Euro-zone facing imminent collapse or at best catastrophic reorganization, and a Chinese economic bubble expanding, I am reminded of what my dear friend and Greek historian Thucydides once said about 400 years before the birth of Jesus Christ. ” Democracies always self destruct because the people will spend them into bankruptcy”.  Perhaps old Thucydides wasn’t yet introduced to socialism and communism, democracy being an ancient Greek idea. Surely he would have seen the folly of socialism and communism don’t you think? In fact, I bet he would have said” Socialism and Communism WILL self destruct because the government WILL spend them into bankruptcy.”

I wonder what he would say about the mess we’re in now, not to mention what is going on in his beloved Greece? I bet he would have a hard time differentiating between what we call democracy, socialism and communism aside from the apparent end result of each.

Why is it that an ancient Greek historian knew of this basic principle thousands of years ago and yet the most highly educated political, legal, economic, and financial minds of the modern world fail to grasp it? Rather ironic don’t you think?

-DF

Written by David Frederick

November 29, 2011 at 12:23 PM

Posted in Economics, General

Here’s A Cheery Thought!

Here’s a cheery thought…

According to the latest daily statement from the U.S. Treasury, the U.S. government had an operating cash balance of $73.8 billion at the end of the day yesterday. Apple’s last earnings report (PDF here) showed that the company had $76.2 billion in cash and marketable securities at the end of June.

In other words, the world’s largest tech company has more cash than the world’s largest sovereign government. That’s because Apple collects more money than it spends, while the U.S. government does not. According to the CBO and U.S. Treasury, if you taxed everyone in the U.S. at 100% tax rate, you would not put a dent into the $14.5 trillion dollar defect. Still don’t think there is a spending problem in Washington?

-DF

Written by David Frederick

July 29, 2011 at 9:08 AM